Photos of WWII Notable Women - Page 2

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Lieutenant JG Harriet Ida Pickens & Ensign Frances Wills

- US Navy's first African-American "WAVES" officers.

Navy's first African-American WAVES officers

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Harriet Ida Pickens (left) and Ensign Frances Wills. Photographed after graduation from the Naval Reserve Midshipmen's School (WR) at Northampton, Massachusetts, in December 1944. They were members of the school's final class, and were the Navy's first African-American WAVES officers.

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Harriet Ida Pickens (left), and Ensign Frances Wills congratulate each other

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Harriet Ida Pickens (left), and Ensign Frances Wills congratulate each other after being being commissioned as the first African-American WAVES officers, December 1944.

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Harriet Ida Pickens (left) and Ensign Frances Wills close a suitcase after graduating from the Naval Reserve Midshipmen's School

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Harriet Ida Pickens (left) and Ensign Frances Wills close a suitcase after graduating from the Naval Reserve Midshipmen's School (WR) at Northampton, Massachusetts, circa December 1944.

Other Military Women of Distinction

LTC Elizabeth C. Smith assumes first command of the new Women's Army Corps Training Center

LTC Elizabeth C. Smith assumes first command of the new Women's Army Corps Training Center at Camp Lee, August 4, 1948.

SGM Carolyn James, the first WAC promoted to master sergeant

SGM Carolyn James, the first WAC promoted to master sergeant (or first sergeant). In 1960, she was the first WAC promoted to sergeant major, E-9, while assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Defense Command, Colorado Springs.

Captain Dorothy Stratton, USCGR

Captain Dorothy Stratton, USCGR, commanding officer of the Coast Guard SPARS during WWII.

Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby, the first director of the Woman's Army Auxiliary Corps

Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby, the first director of the Woman's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) and Women's Army Corps (WAC) in WWII.