Photos of WWII Women Civilian Workers - Page 3

Click on any thumbnail below to view the full-size image:

Women welders at the Ingalls Shipbuilders Corporation

Women welders at the Ingalls Shipbuilders Corporation, Pascagoula, MS, in 1943.

Female war correspondents during World War II.

Female war correspondents during World War II. Left to right: Ruth Cowan, Associated Press; Sonia Tomara, New York Herald Tribune; Rosette Hargrove, Newspaper Enterprise Association; Betty Knox, London Evening Standard; Iris Carpenter, Boston Globe; Erika Mann, Liberty magazine.

Miss Grace Weaver, a civil service worker

Women from all fields have joined the production army, Corpus Christi, Texas. Miss Grace Weaver, a civil service worker at the Naval Air Base, and a school teacher before the war, paints the American insignia on repaired Navy plane wings. August 1942.

Mrs. Althea Mitchell, one of three women employed by the railroad as watchmen at grade crossings to replace men who have entered the armed forces.

Mrs. Althea Mitchell of Bay Shore, grandmother and mother of nine children, including one son in the Marines and another in the Army, on duty at Long Island Rail Road crossing in Sayville. Mrs. Mitchell believes that every woman should take an active part in winning the war. She is one of three women employed by the railroad as watchmen at grade crossings to replace men who have entered the armed forces. March 1943.

Swing shift of drill press operators in a west coast airplane factory is composed almost entirely of women.

Women man America's machines in a west coast airplane factory, where the swing shift of drill press operators is composed almost entirely of women. May 1942.

Willa Beatrice Brown earned her pilot's license in 1937, making her the first African American woman to be licensed in the United States.

Willa Beatrice Brown earned her pilot's license in 1937, making her the first African American woman to be licensed in the United States. In 1941, with her flying service and aviation credentials, the U.S. government named Willa as the federal coordinator of the Chicago unit of the Civil Air Patrol civilian pilot training program; she was instrumental in training more than 200 students who went on to become Tuskegee pilots.

A top-notch mechanic, Mary Josephine Farley expertly rebuilds airplane engines.

A top-notch mechanic, Mary Josephine Farley expertly rebuilds airplane engines. Although she is only twenty years old she has a private pilot's license and has made several cross-country flights. August 1942.